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How to promote value to a customer

You know that there is no value in saying, "Our product offers great value...", right? The alcohol industry has this concept down to a tee. You'll never hear an advert that says, "Johnnie Walker Private Collection Whisky, So valuable.. it will cost you an arm and a leg". Instead, they show you visuals of successful gentlemen who follow a lifestyle that suggests value. Your goal should be to suggest what makes your product or service valuable without actually using the word value. The moment you mention the word value, you automatically sound like you're lying. How many LinkedIn inboxes do you get that tell you how they have a valuable offer for you? And you never respond. Why? Because there is no value in saying the word value.

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Why Your Digital Campaign Is Not Selling

Sometimes the reason your digital campaign might not be working could be as basic as the fact that your offer sucks! Testing is a key part of running any digital campaign and the first thing you need to test is whether people would click on your offer if it was for free. You’d assume that people love “free” things but that’s not always the case. Most people won’t click on a simple offer even if it was for free. They say a picture says a thousand words but not really. An image can grab attention but the copy will always be what drives the action. Make sure you’re saying the right things to drive a potential customer to click through on your offer. Make sure the offer is solid by testing if people would click it if it was for free. Once you have the offer on-lock then you can work around how to price it.

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Lukewarm Calling

Ever received one of those, "Good day, is this [Insert Name]? I'm Mary from EliteMobile... Is this a convenient time to talk?". No, Mary, it's not! Honestly speaking it's never a convenient time to give anybody a random sales call. Cold calling is outdated. Customers are now using apps like TrueCaller to avoid spam calls. The amount of money you waste on dead-end phone calls could be better spent generating leads online. That way you can find people who are actually interested in what you have to offer, have them opt-in and schedule the call for a "convenient" time. So instead of the cold-call, you now have a lukewarm potential. Somebody that you're 99% more likely to sell to than the person you're bothering with your unsolicited attempt. It's 2020! Get with the program!

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Intent or Interruption Marketing

Before you go wild on your marketing strategy it's really important to understand which arena you're playing in. Whether you are taking the intent-based marketing or interruption marketing approach. The obvious question would be, what is the difference? An example of Intent-Based marketing would be when you search for a "restaurant near me" on Google. This is when a customer is actively searching for your product or service. Interruption marketing is that TV ad, billboard or random sales call that catches you off-guard. However, social media marketing has slightly blurred the lines. By correctly using targeting, you can interrupt customers who sort of have the intent to buy what you might be selling. Ever been looking at a potential holiday destination and when you get on Facebook you find ads offering getaway packages? How does this all work?

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The difference between choice and selection in marketing

There's a certain superpower that comes with understanding the difference between choice and selection. It could be the defining factor of your entire customer experience. Choices are usually infinite and selection is limited to a few options. For example, RocoMama's gives customers a choice to build their own burgers. However, this is both an advantage and a flaw at the same time. Some customers may enjoy the freedom and others might find the experience a bit daunting. Especially because you may end up putting together the shittiest combination of sweet, savoury and sour toppings. Even though you made the choices yourself, it leaves a negative impression on the business. On the other hand when you go to McDonald's you have a limited selection of options. Really easy to pick from. So a customer may prefer the simplicity of choosing from a set of limited options rather than spending 30 minutes feeling like they are writing a test paper and can't figure out the answer to an infinite multiple-choice question.

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TikTok went the clock

"Funny" is not a sustainable strategy. I know this will be an unpopular opinion but hear me out. Firstly, the user base on TikTok is mainly little kids. Kids get over things quickly. It's only a matter of time until all the TikTok challenges become challenging to keep interesting. Do you know why most young people ditched Facebook? Because their moms got on it too. Yes, as marketers we see the large user base as an advertising opportunity but remember what happened to Vine? Vine was similar to TikTok. It had a ton of users posting quirky clips. It made a few stars. Boasted 1.5billion video plays a day and soon went bust. The kids ran to Snapchat until their moms got on it too. Now they're all on TikTok. Watch what happens when all the moms and dads are on TikTok. Kids are barely playing outside these days, now we're even ruining the spaces that they play in online. Bloody marketers!

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Think Context before Content – A Nando’s Example

What makes Nando's so relatable on social media? Apart from the fiery personality and tone they always have, the fact that they always speak to relevant topics is key to their success. Instead of bombarding us with unsolicited ads of how tasty their chicken is or latest specials, they always find a way to include themselves in hot and sometimes daring conversations. You might post a negative review and instead of getting the robotic "Dear valued customer, we have escalated your concern to.. blah blah blah" type responses, they might make light of the situation in a relatable and more person-to-person manner. Many brands fail to achieve this type of success online because they don't understand the power of context in the world of content.

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The difference between a feature and a product

How often do you use your cellphone? Your Tablet? Okay.. and your laptop/Computer? Let me use these three examples to show you the difference between a feature and a product and the risk of mistaking the two. This can be the difference between success and failure in launching a new business. Your cellphone and laptop are great products. Your tablet, on the other hand, is a great feature. Why? When you want to do anything mobile, you'll grab your cellphone intuitively. When you want to write up a proposal, you naturally use your laptop. But most of us got tablets because it was just something cool to have. A great feature. Features are a short-term play. Like fidget spinners, hoverboards, selfy sticks... all features that will make you a quick buck, however, you can't build a long-lasting business based on a feature. Long-lasting businesses are built on great products.

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Why companies shouldn’t use Hashtags on Instagram

Contrary to popular belief using hashtags on Instagram, as a business, can affect you negatively.  Think about it. Say for instance you are running a graphic design agency and use #GraphicDesigner, guess who else is using that hashtag? Other graphic designers. The role of hashtags is for the Instagram platforms algorithm to be able to link like-minded profiles. Your potential customers may not be using the same hashtags so you might end up having your posts being served to other businesses offering the same services instead. Almost like trying to sell potatoes to other potato farmers. Hashtags are for the consumer, as a business there are other tactics to use. Here are a few.

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A new type of competitor

If I asked you what the number one competitor to South African Airways (S.A.A) was, what would you say? Probably another airline like FlySafair or so. It's understandable because that's the obvious and traditional way of considering the competition. What if I told you that the number one competitor to most airlines isn't even in the aviation industry? Even hotels and conference venues face the same competitor. Right now due to the Covid 19 pandemic, more and more businesses are getting comfortable using platforms like Zoom to hold meetings and conferences. The number one customer for airlines is the business traveller. Your favourite airline can take you to a meeting in New York and London, but never on the same day. Remote conferencing technology allows you to have 5 different meetings with people from different countries all from the comfort of your home. I Highly doubt that SAA has zoom listed as a competitor on their SWOT analysis. Sometimes your biggest competitor may be in a different industry but may solve the same problem as your business in a quicker, cheaper and more convenient way.

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